Zachary junior attends honors program for future medical leaders

Alexandra Barfield, a junior at Zachary High School, was a delegate this summer to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Massachusetts.

The congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields.

The purpose of the event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help students reach their goal, a news release said.

Barfield was nominated to represent Louisiana by Robert Darling, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. The nomination was based on Barfield’s academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

Barfield plans to become a biomedical engineer specializing in medical genetics and research.

During the three-day event, Barfield joined students from across the country and heard Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science Winners speak about leading medical research.

Ivy League and top medical school deans gave advice on what to expect in medical school. Patients who are living medical miracles and teen medical science prodigies told their stories at the conference. Others shared information on cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

Barfield was chosen by the congress to be the recipient of the “Fast Pass” via a social media contest among delegates. With the Fast Pass, she was able to skip all the lines and meet the speakers, including Nobel Prize Winner Mario Capecchi, Harvard University associate professor Pardis Sabeti, and Intel Science and Engineering Fair winner Jack Andraka.

Peninsula High student attends prestigious congress for medical leaders

A few months ago, 16-year-old Peninsula High School soon-to-be junior Hailie Devers visited the Key Peninsula Lions Club seeking assistance to fulfill her ambition to serve as a delegate at the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Massachusetts, June 26 to 27.

It is a congress for high school students interested in going into the medical field.

“I first heard about the Congress when I opened up a letter sometime in January saying that I had been selected,” Hailie said. “Being selected was only the first part. Besides the tuition we had to pay, there was also travel and lodging expenses.”

So for the next few months, Hailie and her mother reached out to different family members through a GoFundMe on Facebook and sending letters to multiple community groups including the KP Lions, the Gig Harbor Elks, and more. Not only were there money requirements, but Hailie also had to have a confirmed minimum G.P.A of 3.5.

As the date got closer, she received emails from the congress about an award she would get from the teacher who nominated her after she attended.

“At the time, I had no clue how I got nominated, so for a couple days I went around my school asking all my teachers, even some that I’d had the previous year,” Hailie said.

She either got ‘I haven’t heard of the congress,’ or ‘No, I didn’t nominate you.’ Eventually, she called and learned that on a standardized test she put that she was interested in going into the medical field and had the grades to get in.

KP Lions and others were proud to assist Hailie, who noted that she had help from Laureate Gamma Eta, “They were the first organization to help me,” she said.

Hailie, her mother and grandmother boarded a plane to Washington D.C. then took another to Boston. They arrived June 24, a day before the Congress. The first day of the Congress started at 4 p.m. and went until 11 p.m. The last two days started at 10 a.m. and went until 11 p.m.

“During the Congress, we listened and took notes on different speakers. It’s not as boring as it sounds,” said Hailie. “All the speakers made jokes, and after every couple of speakers we’d have a break. We could send questions to the speakers through Twitter and post pictures using Snapchat. There were speakers from all different areas of the medical field, including young prodigies, multiple Nobel Prize winners, doctors, and three patients of astounding feats of medicine.”

During the two-hour lunch and dinner break, Hailie could visit and talk to the different speakers.

At the end of the third day, there was a dance.

“It was a great opportunity to hang out with all the people who came and have some fun,” Hailie said.

“All in all, it was a great experience,” she added. “I was given the chance to hear from many different people and meet students my age with the same aspirations from all over the country. We were given amazing advice from all the speakers, including an ‘easy’ nine-step plan to win a Nobel Prize. I came back more inspired and determined than ever before to make my dreams come true.”

Hailie plans to become a veterinarian for large animals such as horses, cows, sheep and other farm animals. To get there, she first plans on attending Washington State University and majoring in zoology. After four years, she wants to attend the Veterinary School on the Pullman campus.

I, for one, am confident you will do just that, Hailie. All the best!

Bowman-Bethune senior serves as delegate for FML

La’Tonia Murdaugh, a senior at Bethune-Bowman Middle High, was a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Massachusetts in June.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and to provide a path and a plan to help them reach their goal.

Murdaugh was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists, to represent South Carolina based on her academic achievement, leadership and potential to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

During the three-day Congress, Murdaugh was joined by other students from across the country. The students heard Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical research, received advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans, heard stories from patients and learned about cutting-edge advances and the future of medicine and technology.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” said Richard Rossi, executive director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. “Focused, bright and determined students like La’Tonia Murdaugh are our future, and she deserved all the mentoring and guidance we can give her.”

The academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medical science. Some of the services and programs the are online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances.

For more information about the academy, visit www.futuredocs.com or call 617-307-7425.

Achievers for Aug. 15

PIEDMONT — Karsen Pierce, a junior at Piedmont High School, was a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders.

The gathering held June 25-27 in Lowell, Massachusetts, was an honors program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research.

The daughter of Jamie Gee and Blake Pierce, Karsen is a member of the school volleyball and soccer teams and the National Honor Society.

Young Immigrants Tell the Story of How They Came Here

The project to capture and preserve the stories of these young immigrants is being directed by three Drake professors from three university departments. Lourdes Gutierrez Najera is an assistant professor of anthropology.

“I’m an immigrant, so this is part of my life’s work,” she says.

Her family came from border towns in Mexico. The things she’s hearing from the students resonate.

“In listening to these stories, I’m just reminded of the resilience of these young people,” she says.

They also hit home for another of the Drake professors, Kevin Lam from the School of Education.

“I came to the U.S. in 1979, when I was about six,” he says. “I came here as a boat person, part of the second wave that left Vietnam.”

Lam’s eyes moisten as he reflects on what the story-sharing project means for him.

“I’ve gotten emotional because at the most basic level it’s a visceral reaction to the experiences that are based on a lot of pain and trauma,” Lam says.

But it takes a non-immigrant, Drake senior Drew Finney from Waukee, to explain why people should listen to the podcasts once they’re posted on-line.

“Because everyone has a different experience in life,” Finney says. “It’s important to understand other people’s perspectives so you’re not stuck in your own bubble.”

Among the goals of this digital exercise in storytelling is to break down stereotypes, to make the debate over immigration more personal. It’s been eight years since Anjana Drukpa arrived in Des Moines from the mountains of Nepal. Her mother was a trained pharmacist, but worked as a laundress to provide for her daughters. One of Drukpa’s sisters works as a translator, another is studying to be a medical assistant. Drukpa is using her story to offer thanks.

“I’ve earned so many recognitions from school,” Drukpa says. “I went to the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists this summer at Boston University. We’re just working really hard to make our mom proud for what she has done for us.”

The immigrant podcasts will go up on Sound Cloud, iTunes and a customized web site in September.

Sierra-Shae Brandt Nominated For The Congress Of Future Medical Leaders In Boston, MA

Sierra Shae Brandt, a junior at Pleasant Plains High School of Pleasant Plains is a Delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, MA on June 25-27, 2017.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.

Sierra-Shae Brandt was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the Medical Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Pleasant Plains based on her academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

During the three-day Congress, Sierra Shae Brandt will join students from across the country and hear Noble Laureates and National Medal of Science Winners talk about leading medical research; be given advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witness stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; be inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learn about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

‘This is a crucial time in America where we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,’ said Richard Rossi, Executive Director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. ‘Focused, bright and determined students like Sierra-Shae Brandt are our future and she deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give her.’

The Academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medial science. Some of the services and programs the Academy offers are online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and much more.

Baton Rouge Magnet High freshman attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders

Isabella Cuneo attended the Congress of Future Medical Leaders held June 25-27 in Lowell, Massachusetts. The honors-only program is for high schoolers planning a career in medicine.

The Baton Rouge Magnet High School ninth-grader was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. She was chosen based upon academic achievement, leadership potential and intent to work in the field of medicine.

Delegates from across the country heard from Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners, got advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans, heard from patients and teen medical science prodigies, and learned about medical advances and technology.

The Congress of Medical Future Medical Leaders is sponsored by the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists, which offers free programs and services to students interested in becoming doctors or entering medical science.

Student attends honor conference

Today’s youth are tomorrow’s leaders.
Henryetta High School sophomore honor student, Kaylie Hamric, is already taking steps toward her future. The teen was nominated to attend the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, MA earlier this summer.
“The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields,” her father, Seth Hamric, said. “The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and to, after the event, provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.”
Hamric was nominated to attend the conference by Dr. Robert Darling, medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. She was chosen to represent Henryetta High School as a result of her leadership potential, academic achievements and determination to serve in the field of medicine.
“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” Executive Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists, Richard Rossi, said. “Focused, bright and determined students like Kaylie Hamric are our future and she deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give her.”
Services the academy offers include online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate, opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students, communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and more.
The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists was founded on the belief that prospective medical talent must be identified at the earliest possible age to help students acquire the necessary experience and skills to take them to the doorstep of their future career.
The academy is based in Washington D.C., with offices in Boston, MA.

Education Notes

Honor student Eric Perkins nominated for The Congress of Future Medical Leaders  Eric Perkins, who will be a junior at West Shamokin High School of Cowanshannock was chosen a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Mass. on June 25-27. He is the son of Matthew and Jessica Perkins of Rayburn.

Planning with purpose

Becoming a doctor is no easy feat, and several organizations help future doctors find the correct path they should take. Since middle school, Katelyn Clark of Godley has known she’s wanted to become a doctor.

To get a head start, she attended the Congress of Future Medical Leaders conference from June 26-30 in Boston, Massachusetts.

The honors-only program is hosted by the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists for high school students to meet, talk and listen to professional doctors from all over the nation.

The purpose of the event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical students, to stay true to their dream and after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal, according to its website.

Clark, 15, said she and 3,000 other students heard Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners discuss leading medical research; received advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witnessed stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; were inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learned about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

“It’s a bunch of high schoolers coming together to learn about what they all love, which is medicine, and getting to get that one step ahead of everyone else,” Clark said. “Most of [the doctors] talked about how your age doesn’t hold you back from doing the things you want to do in life or how the mistakes you made help shape you into the person you’re going to be.”

Being able to talk with other students around her age was amazing, she said.

“Just seeing how many people were there that do what you want to do, it’s crazy,” she said. “I didn’t expect there to be so many people there.”

Every student she met was going to be a junior or senior in the fall.

“I didn’t meet anyone my age,” she said. “It was really different because they didn’t treat me like I was just young and I didn’t understand. They treated me like I was their age.”

NAFPMS Executive Director Richard Rossi said this is a crucial time in America where there is a need for more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially.