KHS sophomores chosen as delegates to medical program

Zoe Litten and Morgan Foutz, sophomores at Keyser High School, were delegates to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Massachusetts, on June 25- 27, 2017.
The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan, and resources to help them reach their goal.
Zoe and Morgan were nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists, to represent Keyser High School based on their academic achievement, leadership potential, and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.
During the three-day Congress, Zoe and Morgan joined students from across the country and heard Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical research; were given advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witnessed stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; were inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and
learned about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.
“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” said Richard Rossi, executive director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists.
“Focused, bright and determined students like Zoe Litten and Morgan Foutz are our future and they deserve all the mentoring and guidance we can give them.“
The Academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medical science. Some of the services and programs the Academy offers are online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and much more.
The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists was founded on the belief that we must identify prospective medical talent at the earliest possible age and help these students acquire the necessary experience and skills to take them to the doorstep of this vital career. Based in Washington, D.C. and with offices in Boston, the Academy was chartered as a nonpartisan, taxpaying institution to help address this crisis by working to identify, encourage and mentor students who wish to devote their lives to the service of humanity as physicians, medical scientists.
For more information visit www.FutureDocs.com or call 617-307-7425.

Local Youth Has Summer Learning Experience Of A Lifetime

A local teen spent three days last month learning from some of the best and brightest in the medical industry. On June 26-28, Logandale resident, Rebecca Rebman, 16, attended the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Boston, Massachusetts.

The event brought together 4,500 high school students to the University of Massachusetts, Boston from all over the country. All of these students had demonstrated high academic achievement and strong leadership potential. And all were interested in pursuing the medical field.

Rebman, who is interested in training to be a registered nurse after high school, said that she was impressed by the caliber of youth attending the event. She was especially struck by the group’s focus and discipline over the three long days. The Congress was held from 8:00 am to 11:00 pm each day, with breaks only for lunch and dinner.

“Usually with a teen-age group our attention span can be pretty short,” Rebman said. “But this group stayed engaged and paying attention for the entire schedule all day. Everyone was taking notes, being attentive, and participating in the presentations.”

Despite the long days, Rebman emphasized that the Congress was far from dull or boring for the students. “It was amazing!” she said in an interview last week. “All the speakers from start to finish were leaders in their fields. They talked about their ideas, we got to watch their techniques and hear about their advances in technology.”

Many of the presenters at the Congress were just teens themselves; medical science prodigies who had dared to dream of new medical advances, and brought them into reality.

One of these young presenters was Jack Andraka who, as a high school freshman, invented a new method of possibly detecting early stage pancreatic cancer.

Another presenter was Olivia Hallisey, a teen from Greenwich, Connecticut who developed a groundbreaking new test for diagnosing the ebola virus. The test won Hallisey the first prize in the 2015 Google Science Fair.
“She was only 16 when she figured that out,” Rebman said of Hallisey. “It was pretty amazing.”

Of course, these were just the tip of the iceberg in what was presented to the youth attendees. Presenters at the Congress included four Nobel Prize winners. One presenter was the recipient of the first ever successful full-face transplant.

Congress attendees were able to watch a surgeon in action. Renowned laparoscopic surgeon Adrian Park demonstrated a minimally invasive surgical procedure to repair a hiatal hernia. The youth in attendance were able to watch the operation and ask questions of the surgeon while the surgery was ongoing.
“He was talking and explaining things to us while he was working on the patient,” Rebman said. “It was pretty incredible to see somewhat that steady-minded and experienced to do that.”
Rebman said that she came away from the Congress with a renewed respect for the brilliant minds in the medical profession.
“It is definitely a career to look up to, with so many people who want to save lives,” she said. “I just think that the medical field is amazing.”

Julian attends program for future medical leaders

Iron Mountain graduate Miranda Julian was a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in June held in Lowell, Mass.

The congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research field The purpose of the event is to honor, inspire and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical science so they stay true to their dream and after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal

Julian was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Michigan. She was selected based on her academic achievement, leadership and potential , and determination to serve in the field of medicine.

She joined other students from across the country during the three day Congress and heard from Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical resource. She also received advice from top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” noted Richard Rossi, executive director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists.

“Focused, bright and determined students like Miranda Julian are our future and she deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give her,” Rossi added.

The academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medical science. There are opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students, communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and much more.

LISD student nominated to attend Congress of Future Medical Leaders

A local student has been nominated to attend this year’s Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Boston Massachusetts. The event honors and inspires top students across the country.

The congress is an honors-only program for high schoolers who want to become physicians or go into the medical field.

Coming up tonight on KGNS News at Ten, we’ll hear from the Martin High School student and the Health Science Magnet Program that has helped him achieve this goal.

 

Honor Student Sydney Hillman Nominated for the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Boston

Sydney Hillman, a rising Junior at Chattahoochee High School is a Delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, MA on June 25-27, 2017.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream ans, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.

Sydney Hillman was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the Medical Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Chattahoochee High School based on her academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

Sydney is the daughter of John and Stephanie Hillman of Johns Creek.

TEAGUE HONOR STUDENT NOMINATED FOR CONGRESS OF FUTURE MEDICAL LEADERS

Kaigen Pillette, a 10th grade student at Teague High School and resident of Fairfield is a Delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, MA held on June 25-27, 2017.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.

Kaigen Pillette was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the Medical Director of the National Academy of
Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Teague High School based on his academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

During the three-day Congress, Kaigen Pillette joined students from across the country and hear Nobel
Laureates and National Medal of Science Winners talk about leading medical research; be given advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witness stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; be inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learn about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” said Richard Rossi, Executive Director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. “Focused, bright and determined students like Kaigen Pillette are our future and he deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give him.”

The Academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medical science. Some of the services and programs the Academy offers are online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and much more.

The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists was founded on the belief that we must identify prospective medical talent at the earliest possible age and help these students acquire the necessary experience and skills to take them to the doorstep of this vital career. Based in Washington, D.C. and with offices in Boston, MA, the Academy was chartered as a nonpartisan, taxpaying institution to help address this crisis by working to identify, encourage and mentor students who wish to devote their lives to the service of humanity as physicians, medical scientists.

Presenters included, Dr. Robert Darling, former physician to the President of the United States, Dr. Bohdan Pomahac, who performed the first full face transplant in the country, Carme Tarleton, recipient of the worlds first full face transplant, Larry Hester, recipient of the bionic eye, and Dr. Rick Sacra, humanitarian and Ebola Survivor.

Kaigen was also inducted into the Society of Torch and Laurel during the congress. The Society of Torch and Laurel is developed by The Natinoal Society of Collegiate Scholars to recognize high school high-achievers and provide them and their families vital tools for successfully transitioning to college. Kaigen Pillette is the son of Kibbie and Chekeitha Pillette of Fairfield, TX. Paternal Grandparents are Kibbie Pillette Sr. and Pauline Hawthorne. Maternal Grandparents are Richard and Dianne Landry all of Abbeville, La.

In the summer of 2018 Kaigen will get the opportunity to travel to Mexico for two week to get hands on experience and work side by side with some of the best physicians in the world.

Georgetown High honor student attends physician congress

Angela Hawkins remembers her daughter, Kristen, at age 5 watching the surgery channel on television before she went to bed.

“She stuck with that through elementary and middle school, watching different procedures including live births,” she said. “I thought she was kind of young, but that was what she wanted to watch.”

Kristen said she thinks she found the channel because it was close to the Disney Channel.

“At first, I thought it was a little gross, but it was interesting,” Kristen said. “I wanted to know, how did that baby get out of there?”

Now a rising sophomore at Georgetown High School, Kristen is planning to pursue a medical career and was chosen to be a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Massachusetts this summer.

The annual Congress, held from June 25 to 27, is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of the event was to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.

Kristen was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the Medical Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Georgetown High School “based on her academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.”

Her mother is a national board certified fourth-grade teacher at Sampit Elementary School and her father, Leonard Hawkins, is a dietary aid at National Health Care in Murrells Inlet. She has one brother, DaShawn Hawkins, 12, a seventh-grader at Georgetown Middle School.

During the three-day Congress, Kristen joined students from across the country and heard Nobel laureates and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical research, according to a press release. She was also given advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witnessed stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; was inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learned about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” said Richard Rossi, Executive Director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. “Focused, bright and determined students like Kristen Hawkins are our future and she deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give her.”

Kristen said her favorite part of the three-day program was hearing about a patient from Liberia.

“She looked pregnant, but she had a tumor in her stomach,” Kristen said. “It was interesting because we don’t really see things like that in the U.S.”

She also enjoyed watching a hernia surgery performed on the screens of the large auditorium where the congress was held.

“I thought it was cool that they showed us that,” she said. “They had a camera on the instrument that the doctor was using to do the surgery.”

Kristen said attending the congress gave her insight into other paths in the medical field, including pediatrics, ophthalmology and anesthesiology.

“It really broadened my perspective on the medical field and made me think about other career paths,” she said. “It also made me think about taking more math and science classes in high school.”

The Academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medical science, the release states. Some of the services and programs the Academy offers are online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and much more.

The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists was founded on the belief that it is important to “identify prospective medical talent at the earliest possible age and help these students acquire the necessary experience and skills to take them to the doorstep of this vital career.”

Based in Washington, D.C. and with offices in Boston, the Academy was chartered as a nonpartisan, taxpaying institution to help address this crisis by working to identify, encourage and mentor students who wish to devote their lives to the service of humanity as physicians, medical scientists.

Drury Sophomore Attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders

Kelsey Haley, a sophmore at Drury High School, attended the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Mass., from June 25-27.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.

Haley was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists, to represent Drury High School based on her academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

During the three-day Congress, Haley joined students from across the country and heard Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science Winners talk about leading medical research; was given advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witnessed stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; was inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learned about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” said Richard Rossi, Executive Director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. “Focused, bright and determined students like Kelsey Haley are our future and she deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give her.”

The Academy offers free services and programs to students who want to be physicians or go into medical science. Some of the services and programs the Academy offers are online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance and much more.

Achievers

Madalyn White, a freshman at Westmoore High School, was a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Lowell, Massachusetts.

An honors-only program for high schools students, the congress is designed for students who want to become physicians or want to enter into medical research fields.

White was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists.

During the three-day program, White joined other students from across the U.S. and heard talks from Noble Laureates and National Medal of Science winners.

Bartlett student represents TN at medical honors program

Taylor Elliott of Bartlett, a junior at Briarcrest Christian High School in Eads, served as a delegate to the Congress of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists in Lowell, Mass. The event was June 25-28 on the campus of the University of Massachusetts.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. Taylor was nominated by Dr. Robert Darling, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians, to represent the State of Tennessee based on his academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

During the four-day Congress, Taylor joined 4,000 students from across the country, hearing physicians, Nobel laureates, and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical research and cutting-edge advances in medicine and medical technology.

“This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially,” said Richard Rossi, executive director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. “Focused, bright and determined students like Taylor Elliott are our future and he deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give him.”